Plutocracy and Politics Kevin Phillips’s new book, “Wealth and Democracy,” is a 422-page doorstopper, but much of the book’s message is contained in one stunning table. That table, in the middle of a chapter titled “Millennial Plutographics,” reports the compensation of America’s 10 most highly paid C.E.O.’s in 1981, 1988 and 2000.

In 1981 those captains of industry were paid an average of $3.5 million, which seemed like a lot at the time. By 1988 the average had soared to $19.3 million, which seemed outrageous. But by 2000 the average annual pay of the top 10 was $154 million. It’s true that wages of ordinary workers roughly doubled over the same period, though the bulk of that gain was eaten up by inflation. But earnings of top executives rose 4,300 percent.

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